Cancer Diet Therapy Union NJ

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Cancer Diet Therapy. You will find helpful, informative articles about Cancer Diet Therapy, including "The Cancer Survivor's Diet". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Union, NJ that will answer all of your questions about Cancer Diet Therapy.

Cancer Hospital of New Jersey at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
(732) 828-3000
195 Little Albany Street
New Brunswick, NJ
Clinic Type
Cancer

Data Provided by:
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
(212) 639-2000
1275 York Avenue
New York, NY
Clinic Type
Cancer

Data Provided by:
Nicole Egenberger
(646) 485-5229
214 Sullivan Street
New York, NY
Business
Nicole Egenberger ND - Remede Naturopathics
Specialties
Nutrition

Data Provided by:
Susan Krieger
(917) 678-2484
635 Madison Ave
New York, NY
Specialties
Acupuncture, Acupressure, Nutrition, Macrobiotic Counseling, Qi-Gong-Yoga
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Super Bill given to those covered for Acupuncture out of network
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes

Additional Information
Member Organizations: NCCAOM Board Certified in Acupuncture and Asian Bodywork Therapy, AOBTA Senior Instructor, MEA--Senior Macrobiotic Counselor


Data Provided by:
Eastern School of Acupuncture and Traditional Medicine
(973) 746-2848
427 Bloomfield Ave., 3rd Floor
Montclair, NJ
Specialty
Acupuncture, Herbology, Massage Therapy, Nutrition, Qi Gong, Tai Chi, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tui Na
Associated Hospitals
Student Clinic

NYU Cancer Institute
(888) 769-8633
550 First Avenue
New York, NY
Clinic Type
Cancer

Data Provided by:
Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
(212) 851-5273
161 Fort Washington Avenue
New York, NY
Clinic Type
Cancer

Data Provided by:
Jerry Szych, D.C.
(908) 604-9000
665 Martinsville Road
Basking Ridge, NJ
Business
Somerset Hills Health & Medical Associates
Specialties
Chiropractic, Acupuncture, Nutrition, Psychology, Osteopathic Medicine, Mesotherapy, massage
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Aetna, Cigna, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield, United Healthcare, Oxford and more.
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes

Additional Information
Languages Spoken: English,Polish

Data Provided by:
Jason David Buchwald, MD
(973) 994-4287
22 Old Short Hills Rd Ste 105
Livingston, NJ
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll, Valhalla Ny 10595
Graduation Year: 1997
Hospital
Hospital: St Marys Hospital, Hoboken, Nj
Group Practice: Family Doctor

Data Provided by:
The Center For Optimum Health
(973) 450-1003
567 Franklin Ave
Belleville, NJ
 
Data Provided by:

The Cancer Survivor's Diet

Once you’ve been bitten by The Big C, you have to start eating like your life
depends on it. So it’s out with the meat, alcohol and trans fats, and in with the fruits,
vegetables and vitamins.

By H.K. Jones

May 2006

Diana Dyer, a registered dietitian from Ann Arbor, Michigan, was diagnosed with a cancer called neuroblastoma when she was six months old. She was treated successfully with surgery and very large doses of radiation therapy.

When Dyer was 34 she discovered a lump in her left breast, which was determined to be malignant. She had a radical mastectomy and underwent six cycles of chemotherapy. During the following 10 years, her white blood cell count (an indicator of immune function) never returned to the normal range. Dyer’s next bout with breast cancer began when a tumor was detected on her 10-year anniversary mammogram. She once again endured chemotherapy and surgery.

After her third battle with cancer, Dyer decided she needed something more than conventional cancer treatments to both keep the disease at bay and achieve optimal health. A fork became her weapon of choice—even a dietitian could learn to eat healthier. So she searched the scientific literature for guidance and developed her own anti-cancer diet. She has not had a recurrence to date and her immune function is often within the normal range.

Unlike Dyer, Kathleen Quinn of Washington, DC has never been diagnosed with cancer. But her mother has ovarian melanoma and her grandmother died of the disease, so she knows all too well the danger she faces. To help her fight against the looming killer, Quinn has also made substantial changes to her diet. “I’m completely terrified of cancer and I want to protect myself,” she says.
Quinn and Dyer are just a few of the many people worried about cancer who are turning to their diets for protection, and it’s no wonder.

Diet and Disease

Cancer is not a single disease, but the generic name for over 100 medical conditions involving uncontrolled and abnormal cell growth. Even though scientists are only beginning to understand the causes and development of cancer, a growing body of evidence shows that what we eat plays a large role in its prevention. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR), 30% to 40% of all cancers are directly linked to our diet and related factors like staying fit and maintaining a healthy weight.

For more than 10 million people in the US who have undergone successful cancer treatment, proper nutrition is absolutely critical. “Studies show that what we eat can influence a whole range of hormones, growth factors and controllers of cell growth, leading to the expectation that diet plays an important role in survival after cancer,” says Karen Collins, registered dietitian and AICR nutrition advisor. In fact, each time you pick a fruit, vegetable or bean, you add a brick to the foundation of your health—an active part you can take in your recovery and survival.

It’s impo...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Energy Times