Salt Substitues Antioch TN

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Publix
(615) 331-4912
15544 Old Hickory Blvd
Nashville, TN
Pharmacy #
(615) 331-4961

Aldi
3758 Nolensville Pike
Nashville, TN
Store Hours
Monday-Friday 9am - 8pm
Saturday 9am - 8pm
Sunday 10am - 7pm

Trader Joe'S
(615) 297-6560
3909 Hillsboro Pike
Nashville, TN
Store Hours
8:00 am - 9:00 pm

Whole Foods Market
(615) 440-5100
4021 Hillsboro Pike
Nashville, TN
 
Target
(615) 889-4734
3171 Lebanon Pike
Nashville, TN
Store Hours
M-Fr: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Sa: 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.Su: 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.

Sam'S Club
(615) 834-9092
1300 Antioch Pike
Nashville, TN
Pharmacy #
(615)834-3255

Walmart Supercenter
(615) 831-0133
4040 Nolensville Pike
Nashville, TN
Store Hours
Mon-Fri:8:00 am - 10:00 pm
Sat:8:00 am - 10:00 pm
Sun:8:00 am - 10:00 pm
Pharmacy #
(615) 831-0118
Pharmacy Hours
Monday-Friday: 9:00 am - 9:00 pm Saturday: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm Sunday: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Harris Teeter
(615) 269-7818
2201 21St. Avenue South
Nashville, TN
Store Hours
6am-11pm
Pharmacy #
(615) 269-6641
Pharmacy Hours
9am-7pm Mon-Fri

Aldi
1911 Ransom Place
Nashville, TN
Store Hours
Monday-Friday 9am - 8pm
Saturday 9am - 8pm
Sunday 10am - 7pm

Aldi
615 Gallatin Avenue
Nashville, TN
Store Hours
Monday-Friday 9am - 8pm
Saturday 9am - 8pm
Sunday 10am - 7pm

In Search of Salt Substitues

Been told you need to cut back on your salt intake but you’re dreading a lifetime
of dull, bland food? Cheer up! With a whole world full of available flavoring agents,
you need never stare longingly at your salt shaker again.

By Lisa James

February 2007

Sugar and unhealthy fat are the dietary villains the media loves to hate, appearing in headlines so frequently that it’s easy to forget about that other culprit: salt. Although vital to health in proper amounts, big food companies are now using this ancient condiment in dangerous excess. “Salt is a heavy, low-cost ingredient that adds bulk and reduces the cost of a product,” says Ian Hemphill, Australian spice exporter and author of The Spice and Herb Bible (Robert Rose). “Heavily salted manufactured foods tend to have the perception of having lots of flavor.” Too much salt can push blood pressure upwards, which doesn’t help the 65 million Americans who have pressure problems.

In fact, the American Medical Association is now urging the federal government to limit the amount of salt that can be added to prepared foods.

Whether you need to get your blood pressure under control or simply want to not feel like you’re feeding off a salt lick, there is an answer to the low-salt/low-taste riddle…and it’s as close as your kitchen cupboard.

Mussels with
Lemongrass Broth

Cooks in the US are coming to appreciate lemongrass for the citrusy tang it imparts to meat and seafood. But you have to respect its sharp, grass-like blades; Ian Hemphill recommends removing any upper sections that aren’t tightly rolled and then peeling off several outer layers before slicing.

1 tbsp oil
4 stalks lemongrass, very finely chopped
1 tsp grated gingerroot
2 lbs mussels, scrubbed and beards removed (discard any that are already open)
1/4 cup dry white wine
1/4 cup chicken stock
1 green onion, finely sliced

1. Place oil in a large stockpot over medium heat. Fry lemongrass and ginger for 3 minutes.
2. Increase heat to high and add mussels, wine and stock. Cover tightly and cook for 5 minutes, giving the pot a good shake every 30 seconds to move mussels around from top to bottom. After 5 minutes all the mussels should be open (discard the ones that aren’t).
3. Spoon mussels and broth into large bowls and sprinkle with green onion.

Serves 2. Analysis per serving: 292 calories, 28g protein, 12g fat (2g saturated), 10g carbohydrates

Source: The Spice and Herb Bible, Second Edition by Ian Hemphill with recipes by Kate Hemphill (Robert Rose)

Herbs and spices are Nature’s way of saying “flavor.” These plants have culinary histories going back thousands of years; today, when regional cuisines hopscotch the globe with regularity, all the world’s tastes are increasingly available in the US. But exactly how do you employ those somewhat intimidating ingredients? “I always say that to use spices you do not need any special cooking skills,” Hemphill claims. (If you’re wondering, “herb” refers ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Energy Times