Outdoor Children's Camps North Las Vegas NV

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Little Pastry Chefs
(702) 242-2537
7290 Azure Drive, Suite 110
Las Vegas, NV
Cost
Prices vary by activity
Ages
3And Up
Services Available
Camps, Classes

Boys and Girls Club of Las Vegas
(702) 388-2828
B.C. McCabe Boys and Girls Club,2801 East Stewart Avenue
Las Vegas, NV
Hours
Mon-Fri 7am-7pm
Cost
Fees based on family income
Ages
15-May
Services Available
Camps, Childcare, Classes, Kids Resources

Boys and Girls Club of Las Vegas
(702) 651-5642
800 N. Martin Luther King Boulevard
Las Vegas, NV
Hours
Mon-Fri 7am-7pm
Cost
Fees based on family income
Ages
15-May
Services Available
Camps, Childcare, Classes, Kids Resources

Brinley Community School
(702) 646-9046
6150 Smoke Ranch Road
Las Vegas, NV
Hours
Mon-Fri 12:30pm-8pm
Cost
Varies by activity
Ages
All Ages
Services Available
Camps, Classes, Kids Resources

Mini-Skool Early Learning Center - Las Vegas
(702) 459-3332
4930 E Bonanza Road
Las Vegas, NV
Hours
Mon-Fri 6:30am-6:30pm
Ages
0-12
Services Available
Camps, Childcare

Lone Mountain Taekwondo
(702) 645-5555
4324 North Decatur
Las Vegas, NV
Hours
Mon- Fri 11am-9pm; Sat 10am-3pm; Sun closed
Ages
2And Up
Services Available
Camps, Classes

The Artful Potter
(702) 638-1775
2351 North Rainbow Boulevard, Suite 102
Las Vegas, NV
Hours
Mon-Thu 11am-9pm; Fri-Sat 11am-10pm; Sun 11am-7pm
Cost
Varies
Ages
All Ages
Services Available
Camps

Doolittle Community Center
(702) 229-6374
1950 J Street
Las Vegas, NV
Hours
Mon-Thu 8am-9pm; Fri 8am-8pm; Sat 8am-5:30pm
Ages
All Ages
Services Available
Camps, Classes, Kids Resources

Vitaly Scherbo School of Gymnastics
(702) 259-5020
3250 North Bronco Street
Las Vegas, NV
Hours
Office Mon-Fri 3:30pm-8:30pm; Sat 9am-2pm
Cost
Varies by program
Ages
1And Up
Services Available
Camps, Classes

Water Wings Swim School
(702) 641-7946
8043 N. Durango Drive
Las Vegas, NV
Cost
$$
Ages
All Ages
Services Available
Camps, Classes

Great Big World

Spending time immersed in nature helps produce happy, well-adjusted kids.

By Violet Snow

April 2010

I like to play indoors better ‘cause that’s where all the electrical outlets are—a fourth-grader in San Diego, quoted in Last Child in the Woods (Workman Publishing Company, 2005), in which journalist Richard Louv introduced the concept of “nature deficit disorder” in children.

Freewheeling outdoor play, from building stick shelters to cloudgazing, that was once common for children is much less available to today’s youth—and Louv says they’re missing something vital. He blames influences such as the loss of green space, an obsession with safety, educational pressures and the fascination of electronic media.

Numerous studies show that problems such as obesity, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) improve when kids are exposed to nature. Cornell University researchers found that children with ready access to nature handled stress more successfully (Environment and Behavior 5/03). Scientists at the University of Southern California found that children who had park space within 500 meters of home tended to be less overweight (Association of Research Libraries conference, 4/09).

One recent University of Illinois study, involving children with ADHD, may help explain why interaction with nature is so important for all youngsters. It is based on attention restoration theory. Most of the time we use directed attention, which lets us focus on tasks but also fatigues with use. Involuntary attention is spontaneous and does not require effort. Natural settings often contain elements that engage involuntary attention, which allows directed attention to rest and recover.

In this study, children with ADHD took guided walks for 20 minutes through three different settings: a park, a quiet downtown area and a residential neighborhood. The youngsters’ capacity for concentration was tested after every walk; they scored higher after walking in the park than after the other outings (Journal of Attention Disorders 8/08).

Nature’s regenerative effects can be observed in all children, but they often need encouragement. The second edition of Last Child in the Woods (2008) lists 100 suggestions for connecting kids and nature, such as buying a truckload of dirt to play in; going for a family walk when the moon is full; buying field guides to birds, trees and flowers; planting a butterfly garden; and studying animal tracking.

Andrea Taylor, PhD, one of the University of Illinois researchers, believes that these study results offer clear implications for public policy. “We have to make nature accessible,” she says. “It’s not enough to have a massive park six blocks away. There should be small pockets of natural area near the home.

Louv’s book sparked the creation of a Children and Nature Network ( www.childrenandnature.org ) to promote awareness and push for legislation. Such calls for action are starting to bear f...

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