Nutritional Health Specialists Grand Island NE

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Jenny Craig
(866) 622-9370
2219 N Webb Rd
Grand Island, NE
Alternate Phone Number
(866) 622-9370
Services
Weight Loss, Diet Plans

Elf Enterprises Nikken Independent Wellenss Home Consultant
(308) 381-7953
1322 N Eddy St
Grand Island, NE
 
Pomajzl Chiropractic
(308) 381-5554
3008 W Stolley Park Rd Ste 3
Grand Island, NE
 
Jenny Craig Weight Loss Center
(888) 212-7802
2219 N Webb Rd
Grand Island, NE
 
Dr. Bruce Crabtree
(402) 564-7514
2559 37th Avenue
Columbus, NE
Specialty
Biofeedback, Chiropractors, Color Therapy, Craniosacral Therapy, Detoxification Foot Bath, Flower Essences, Hair Analysis, Homeopathy, Kinesiology, Laser Therapy, Lymphatic Therapy, Magnetic Therapy, Massage Therapy, Myofascial Release, Nutrition, SpectraVision, Stone Massage, Wellness Centers
Associated Hospitals
Avenue Chiropractic & Wellness Clinic

Diet Center
(308) 384-3404
511 N Eddy St
Grand Island, NE
 
Nutrition Life Spa
(308) 390-7689
2441 N Diers Ave
Grand Island, NE
Alternate Phone Number
3083907689
Services
Weight loss Programs, Emotional Eating Counseling, Health & Nutrition Evaluation, Personal Training

The Sports Nutrition Outlet
(308) 384-1550
2300 N Webb Rd
Grand Island, NE
 
Pioneer Totaltrade Medical Alarm Medical Nutrition Therapy Systems, Ll
(402) 403-5700
2505 N 24th St
Omaha, NE
 
Pioneer Totaltrade Medical Alarm Medical Nutrition Therapy Systems, Ll
(402) 403-5700
2505 N 24th St
Omaha, NE
 

Overcoming Nutritional

Many people suffer from low-level shortages of critical nutrients and
don’t even know it. Are you one of them?

By Linda Melone

January 2010

Pellagra. Scurvy. The words seem almost quaint now, and many people wouldn’t recognize them. But pellagra was feared throughout areas of the southern US into the early 20th century, its sufferers marked by the “four Ds”: diarrhea, dermatitis, dementia and death. Go back another hundred years and sailors dreaded scurvy, a disease that caused teeth to fall out and open sores to appear before eventually killing its victims. In time, scientists would realize that both diseases were caused by deficiencies in key nutrients that would come to be known as vitamins: niacin (vitamin B3) in the case of pellagra, vitamin C in the case of scurvy.

Stark deficiencies such as pellagra and scurvy are rare in the modern developed world. But nutrient “insufficiencies” run rampant, fueled by a diet that favors convenience and speed over nutrition and quality. “People with nutrient insufficiencies or suboptimal levels of nutrients usually don’t even know it,” says Allan Magaziner, DO, author of Total Health Handbook: Your Complete Wellness Resource (Kensington) and medical director of the Magaziner Center for Wellness in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

While their consequences may not be immediate, over time nutrient insufficiencies put you at a greater risk of infectious disease and increased chance of early mortality, says Stephen Lawson, former co-director of the Laboratory for Research in Gene Regulation at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. “Insufficiencies can contribute to chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease due to oxidative stress and free radical damage,” he notes.

Falling Short

Many people are falling through the nutritional gaps. According to the USDA, more than 90% of all Americans don’t get enough vitamin E (although actual deficiencies are very rare), 56% come up short on magnesium, 44% are below recommended levels for vitamin A and 31% for vitamin C. In addition, recent estimates of suboptimal vitamin D levels range from 50% to 70% of the adult population.

The root causes of these widespread insufficiencies vary, but “many medicines contribute to deficiencies,” says Magaziner. For example, birth control pills may increase the need for vitamins B6, B12 and C as well as folic acid; statins may inhibit CoQ10 synthesis; and antibiotics can lower levels of vitamins B and K along with probiotics, the healthy bacteria that inhabit the digestive tract.

Finding a Practitioner

Since a standard medical check-up doesn’t address nutritional issues, the best way to find out if you are facing a vitamin deficit is to speak with a healthcare professional who makes nutrition a cornerstone of their practice. Naturopathic physicians (NDs) believe in looking for the root causes of disease, including shortfalls in crucial nutrients, as part of educating pati...

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