Local Produce Waterville ME

Local resource for local produce in Waterville. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to fruits, vegetables, farms and gardening, as well as advice and content on healthy eating.

Downtown Waterville Farmers' Market
680-2055
Waterville, ME
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : Yes
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
Thursday
County
Kennebec

Clinton Community Farm and Flea Market
(207) 426-9651
Sebasticook River Access Park On Main Street (Rt. 100); across from Galusha
Clinton, ME
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
May-November Tues, Sat
County
Kennebec

Augusta Farmers Market
(207) 549-5112
Turnpike Mall, Western Avenue; At the intersections of Whitten Road and Wes
Augusta, ME
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-October Wednesday & Saturday, 9:00a.m. - 12:00noon
County
Kennebec

Skowhegan Farmers Market
(207) 474-6864
Corner of Madison Avenue (Rte. 201) and Pleasant Street; front of the Old G
Skowhegan, ME
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-October Saturday, 9:00a.m. - 1:00p.m.
County
Somerset

Pittsfield Farmers Market
(207) 487-5056
Hathorn Park; Hartland Avenue
Pittsfield, ME
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
May-October Monday & Thursday, 2:00p.m. - 6:00p.m.
County
Somerset

Fairfield Farmers Market
(207) 948-5724
81 81 Main Street (Rte 201); Nazarene Church parking lot
Fairfield, ME
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-October Wednesday, 2:00p.m. - 6:00p.m. Saturday, 9:30a.m. - 1:30p.m.
County
Somerset

Belgrade Lakes Farmers' Market
(207) 465-7058
Across from the Village Inn in Belgrade Lakes Village
Belgrade, ME
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-September Sunday
County
Kennebec

Farmers' Market At Mill Park
(207) 626-2305
1 North Water St.; Old Edwards Mills site
Augusta, ME
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
May-October Tuesday
County
Kennebec

Unity Market Day Farmers Market
568-3043 or 948-9005
Unity Community Center; Route 139, School Street
Unity, ME
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
May-November Saturday, 9:00a.m. - 1:00p.m.
County
Waldo

Liberty-Montville Farmers' Market
(207) 589-4881
next to Peavey's Store; intersection of Rt 3 and 220
Liberty, ME
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
May-November Thurday, Saturday
County
Waldo

Superfruits from around the World

Back before our taste buds were trashed by an excess of refined sugar,
fresh fruit was the dessert of choice. Today the news about fruit’s health
benefits is very sweet—and the best selections come from all over the planet.

July/August 2007

What’s tasty, healthy and hot, hot, hot? It’s the ongoing trend towards superfruits—nutrient-rich treasures that lend themselves to usage in an ever-expanding array of juices and supplements. Sales of such exotic items as goji, noni and mangosteen (in addition to more familiar produce such as blueberries and grapes) continue to grow as more and more people become familiar with their stellar antioxidant and other disease-fighting qualities. These plant versions of Superman now come from practically every continent except Antarctica, in addition to the myriad islands that dot the South Pacific seas; here Energy Times provides a quick introduction to the most notable of the lot.

Black Cherry: Wild and Wonderful

Where It’s From: Eastern North America
Traditional Usages: Jams and pies (the wood being prized for furniture-making); as a therapy for gout and respiratory disorders, and as a stomach tonic
Modern Research Shows: The cherry’s antioxidants appear to inhibit an enzyme called xanthine oxidase, a major source of harmful free radicals; additional phytonutrients and natural anti-inflammatory compounds are believed to relieve symptoms of gout and other inflammatory arthritis conditions

Pomegranate: A Vitamin C Powerhouse

Where It’s From: The area now known as Iran, from where it spread to the Mediterranean; now also grown in California and Arizona, as well as tropical Africa, Malaysia and parts of Southeast Asia
Traditional Usages: As a refreshing drink and flavoring agent (it was the original basis for grenadine)
Modern Research Shows: Chock full of vitamin C and powerful phytonutrients, this multi-seeded fruit has shown an ability to slow cancer growth in the lab; also being studied for protective effects on the brain and heart, and for its antimicrobial properties

Blueberry: The Ultimate Brain Food

Where It’s From: North America; now grown also in Australia, New Zealand and parts of South America
Traditional Usages: Jams, jellies, and baked goods; leaf tea long used to treat diabetes and urinary tract infections
Modern Research Shows: Having blueberries on the brain is a bright idea—these fruits have helped senior rats keep their mental edge and counteracted the kind of damage seen after strokes; other studies also suggest anti-cancer and cholesterol-lowering benefits

Cranberry: A Bladder’s Best Friend

Where It’s From: Acidic bogs throughout the Northern Hemi­sphere; commercially grown in Canada and the northern United States
Traditional Usages: Kidney stone elimination and as a blood purifier
Modern Research Shows: Keeps bacteria from adhering to the urinary tract, allowing it to help prevent bladder infections; may also interfere with infective agen...

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