Immunologists Rock Hill SC

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Gregory Stokes Parsons, MD
(803) 327-4000
1565 Ebenezer Rd Ste 110
Rock Hill, SC
Specialties
Otolaryngology, Allergy
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Carolinas Med Ctr, Charlotte, Nc; Piedmont Med Ctr, Rock Hill, Sc
Group Practice: Central Carolina Ear Nose & Th

Data Provided by:
Rudolph Gordon Johnstone
(864) 458-7431
48 Creekview Ct
Greenville, SC
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
Dr.Bruce Ball
(843) 881-2030
180 Wingo Way # 102
Mount Pleasant, SC
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1981
Speciality
Allergist / Immunologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 4, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Michelle M Montalbano, MD
(843) 792-3712
Ste 812 CSB 96 Jonathan Lucas St
Charleston, SC
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1998

Data Provided by:
Michael William Reder
(864) 269-0386
100 Powers Blvd
Piedmont, SC
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
Steven J McEldowney
(704) 752-3773
8840 Blakeney Professional Drive
Charlotte, NC
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology, Internal Medicine

Data Provided by:
Joseph George Moyer, MD
(843) 293-5000
800 E Cheves St Ste 420
Florence, SC
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology, Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1983
Hospital
Hospital: Mc Leod Reg Medctr, Florence, Sc
Group Practice: Allergy Asthma & Sinus Ctr

Data Provided by:
Dr.Neil Kao
(864) 627-3800
7 Memorial Medical Drive
Greenville, SC
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1988
Speciality
Allergist / Immunologist
General Information
Hospital: Greenville Memorial Hospital
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.4, out of 5 based on 4, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Curtis Allen Bruce, MD
(864) 627-3800
1202 E Butler Rd
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided by:
John Tompkins Ramey, MD
(843) 573-9373
1879 Savage Rd
Charleston, SC
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 2000

Data Provided by:
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The Human Terrain

Your body hosts whole colonies of microorganisms, and scientists are exploring
the beneficial roles many of them play in human health.

By Claire Sykes

June 2009

Your body teems with a world of microorganisms. Trillions of bacteria, viruses and fungi munch away at your skin, crank out enzymes in your mouth and breed like crazy—all while you eat, work and play. The thought of all these critters might be a little discomforting. For the most part, though, you wouldn’t be alive without them.

Though microorganisms have been wriggling under scientists’ microscopes for centuries, little is known about how they affect human health. However, recent technological advancements now allow scientists to explore how colonies of microbes interact with the human body in something called the Human Microbiome Project (HMP).

Launched in 2007 as part of the National Institutes of Health’s Roadmap for Medical Research, this five-year, $100 million project involves dozens of scientists around the country. It’s also part of the International Human Microbiome Consortium (IHMC), which involves experts from Australia, Canada, Europe, China, Japan and Korea.

In 2002, American Nobel Prize-winning molecular biologist Joshua Lederberg came up with the term microbiome, defined as the totality of genomes—made up of DNA, the molecule that encodes genetic information—of all the microorganisms in any given environment, from a spot of saliva to a soil sample. Your body carries ten times as many microbial cells as human ones, which represents a hundred times the number of genes.

Home Sweet Homes

Most of this vast, though individually tiny, swarm lives in the gastrointestinal tract. “The second most populated area is the mouth, because bacteria are introduced by food coming into the body and through contact with our hands and other surfaces,” says Joe Petrosino, PhD, an assistant professor in the molecular virology and microbiology department at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Flex Your Immunity's Muscles

Keeping the friendly microbes in your body happy and healthy is a good first step to keeping your immune system in fighting trim. But in a world awash in fears about the next big epidemic—swine flu? bird flu?—it helps to know what other natural weapons are out there for stocking an immunity arsenal.

Though not as famous as the oil pressed from the tree’s fruit, olive leaf has been equally prized throughout the centuries for its fever-fighting abilities. Today we know that olive leaf acts against a number of harmful microbes, including cold and flu viruses.

Long valued in Ayurveda, India’s traditional healing system, andrographis (A. paniculata) has been found to boost the production of the immune system’s white blood cells. It also promotes the release of interferons, substances that help keep viruses from multiplying.

Arabinogalactan (ARA), a fiber taken from the Western larch (Larix occidentalis), serves double immune du...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Energy Times