Immunologists Cumming GA

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Immunologists. You will find helpful, informative articles about Immunologists, including "The Human Terrain". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Cumming, GA that will answer all of your questions about Immunologists.

Linda D Guydon
(770) 495-6258
4310 Johns Creek Pkwy
Suwanee, GA
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
Alpharetta Integrative Medicine
(770) 667-3006
11810 Northfall Lane, Suite 1201
Alpharetta, GA
Services
Women's Health, Wellness Training, Weight Management, Substance Abuse, Stress Management, Qi Gong, Orthomolecular Medicine, Mind/Body Medicine, General Practice, Chelation Therapy, Bio-identical HRT, Arthritis, Allergy, Addiction, Acupuncture
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Wilfred Q Cole
(770) 475-0807
401 South Main St
Alpharetta, GA
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
David Thomas Upchurch, MD
(865) 250-1141
4604 Meadow Bluff Ln Ste A
Suwanee, GA
Specialties
Otolaryngology, Allergy
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tn, Memphis, Coll Of Med, Memphis Tn 38163
Graduation Year: 1966
Hospital
Hospital: Roane Med Ctr, Harriman, Tn; Methodist Med Ctr Of Oak Ridge, Oak Ridge, Tn; Fort Sanders Parkwest Med Ctr, Knoxville, Tn; Univ Of Tenn Mem Hospital, Knoxville, Tn
Group Practice: East Tennessee Otolaryngology

Data Provided by:
Cheryl Lynn Walker, MD
(312) 443-1220
2811 Grey Moss Pass
Duluth, GA
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
David D Tanner
(770) 495-6258
4310 Johns Creek Pkwy
Suwanee, GA
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
Wilfred Qualls Cole III, MD
(770) 475-0807
401 S Main St Ste C1
Alpharetta, GA
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ms Sch Of Med, Jackson Ms 39216
Graduation Year: 1979
Hospital
Hospital: Childrens Healthcare Of Atlant, Atlanta, Ga
Group Practice: Atlanta Allergy Clinic

Data Provided by:
Wilfred Q Cole, MD
(601) 366-5665
401 S Main St Ste C1
Alpharetta, GA
Specialties
Pediatrics, Pediatric Allergy
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Va Sch Of Med, Charlottesville Va 22908
Graduation Year: 1951

Data Provided by:
John Alfred Zora, MD
(770) 995-1537
401 S Main St Ste B8
Alpharetta, GA
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Pa State Univ Coll Of Med, Hershey Pa 17033
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided by:
EasyShop Demo, MR
(123) 234-2323
4400 North Point Pkwy.
Alpharetta, GA
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 1950

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

The Human Terrain

Your body hosts whole colonies of microorganisms, and scientists are exploring
the beneficial roles many of them play in human health.

By Claire Sykes

June 2009

Your body teems with a world of microorganisms. Trillions of bacteria, viruses and fungi munch away at your skin, crank out enzymes in your mouth and breed like crazy—all while you eat, work and play. The thought of all these critters might be a little discomforting. For the most part, though, you wouldn’t be alive without them.

Though microorganisms have been wriggling under scientists’ microscopes for centuries, little is known about how they affect human health. However, recent technological advancements now allow scientists to explore how colonies of microbes interact with the human body in something called the Human Microbiome Project (HMP).

Launched in 2007 as part of the National Institutes of Health’s Roadmap for Medical Research, this five-year, $100 million project involves dozens of scientists around the country. It’s also part of the International Human Microbiome Consortium (IHMC), which involves experts from Australia, Canada, Europe, China, Japan and Korea.

In 2002, American Nobel Prize-winning molecular biologist Joshua Lederberg came up with the term microbiome, defined as the totality of genomes—made up of DNA, the molecule that encodes genetic information—of all the microorganisms in any given environment, from a spot of saliva to a soil sample. Your body carries ten times as many microbial cells as human ones, which represents a hundred times the number of genes.

Home Sweet Homes

Most of this vast, though individually tiny, swarm lives in the gastrointestinal tract. “The second most populated area is the mouth, because bacteria are introduced by food coming into the body and through contact with our hands and other surfaces,” says Joe Petrosino, PhD, an assistant professor in the molecular virology and microbiology department at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Flex Your Immunity's Muscles

Keeping the friendly microbes in your body happy and healthy is a good first step to keeping your immune system in fighting trim. But in a world awash in fears about the next big epidemic—swine flu? bird flu?—it helps to know what other natural weapons are out there for stocking an immunity arsenal.

Though not as famous as the oil pressed from the tree’s fruit, olive leaf has been equally prized throughout the centuries for its fever-fighting abilities. Today we know that olive leaf acts against a number of harmful microbes, including cold and flu viruses.

Long valued in Ayurveda, India’s traditional healing system, andrographis (A. paniculata) has been found to boost the production of the immune system’s white blood cells. It also promotes the release of interferons, substances that help keep viruses from multiplying.

Arabinogalactan (ARA), a fiber taken from the Western larch (Larix occidentalis), serves double immune du...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Energy Times