Hybrid Cars Everett MA

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Hybrid Cars. You will find helpful, informative articles about Hybrid Cars, including "Escaping the Oil Trap". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Everett, MA that will answer all of your questions about Hybrid Cars.

Hondar House Inc
(617) 547-1950
227 Prospect St
Cambridge, MA
Services
Oil Change and Lube,AC and Heating Repair,Auto Repair,Brake Repair,Clutch Repair,Mufflers Repair,Auto Dealers

Atlantic Toyota
(781) 599-4922
671 Lynnway
Lynn, MA
Services
Auto Repair,Truck Dealers,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Albrecht Auto Group
(781) 933-1100
394 Washington St
Ste A1
Woburn, MA
Services
Clutch Repair,Fuel Injection Repair,Service Stations,SUV Repair,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Clark and White Inc
(617) 928-5400
777 Washington Street
Newtonville, MA
Services
Alignment Repair,Auto Body Repair,Fuel Injection Repair,Radiator Repair,Tune up Repair,Auto Dealers

Ira Motor Group
(978) 739-8600
99 Andover Street, # B
Danvers, MA
Services
Truck Service Station,Auto Dealers

Civic Center Honda Toyota
(617) 539-4460
96 Pauline Street
Winthrop, MA
Services
Emissions Testing,Auto Dealers

Parts
(781) 935-7009
200 Cambridge Road
Woburn, MA
Services
Clutch Repair,Auto Dealers

Westminster Dodge Inc
(617) 288-3100
710 William T Morrissey Boulevard
Boston, MA
Services
Auto Body Repair,Truck Auto Body,Truck Dealers,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Clay Auto Sales Service Body Shop
(617) 323-3434
361 Belgrade Ave
West Roxbury, MA
Services
Auto Body Repair,Auto Repair,Used Truck Dealers,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Shaw Auto Sales
(781) 849-1230
29 Messina Dr
Braintree, MA
Services
Auto Inspection,SUV Repair,Truck Dealers,Used Truck Dealers,Used Car Dealers,Auto Dealers

Escaping the Oil Trap

Escaping the Oil Trap

Selflessness doesn’t just benefit recipients, but those on the giving side of the
equation, too. The bonus: There are so many ways to give, whether you are being
charitable with your money, time or love. Here’s what science says about
altruism and how it enhances all our lives.

By Eric Schneider

July August 2008

Our use of petroleum and fossil fuels is downright addicting, not to mention environmentally hazardous. Can we slip oil’s greasy grasp before it does us in? The health of the planet’s water and air hinges on finding an answer to what may be the most crucial question of our time.

Ouch! Filling up the tank costs from $60 to a wince-inducing $100 for bigger vehicles, and even fuel-efficient cars tend to rack up $40 to $50 receipts at the pump. With costs for regular unleaded fuel climbing above a staggering $4 per gallon at press time, frustrations with Big Oil have reached a new peak. Coupled with an interest in more environmentally friendly fuel options, this has prompted steady rumblings for oil independence to grow louder.

Getting the Most
from Your Gas

Saving your pennies for that sweet little hybrid in the dealer’s showroom? Good move, but you can conserve fuel even before you trade up by heeding the following tips, courtesy of the National Resources Defense Council ( www.nrdc.org , 212-727-2700).

Given that as a nation we collectively run through roughly 55,000 gallons of gas a day, these simple ideas can save wear on both the environment and your wallet.

∗ Don’t be a leadfoot. Dropping from 75 to 65 MPH, for example, can cut your gas usage by 15%.

∗ Get tuneups on a regular basis. Keeping your engine in good shape can not only net you another 15% drop in consumption but can increase your car’s useful lifespan. When you do visit the mechanic, ask about energy-conserving motor oils.

∗ Keep your tires at the correct pressure. Under-inflation reduces mileage.

∗ If you’re going to be sitting for a while—at a railroad crossing or waiting for the coach to dismiss your child’s team—cut the engine. Idling for more than 30 seconds consumes more gas than a restart.

∗ Team up with your coworkers on your daily ride to work, or ask your employer about telecommuting at least part of the time. Use mass transit whenever possible.

Becoming energy self-sufficient by weaning ourselves off of foreign oil is far from easy or direct. The United States consumes 20.5 million barrels of oil a day—roughly a quarter of world oil production—but produces only 5.1 million barrels per day. This means that to become oil independent, we need to reduce our oil consumption by 75%, observes Jonathan Dorn, PhD, MPP, staff researcher at the Earth Policy Institute in Washington, DC. This heavy reliance on foreign oil is deeply ingrained in both the economy and the energy industry. Even with considerable instability in regions that supply much of our petrol...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Energy Times