High Blood Pressure Treatment Indianapolis IN

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John Wayne Fehrenbacher, MD
(317) 923-1787
1801 Senate Blvd Ste 755
Indianapolis, IN
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 1976
Hospital
Hospital: Methodist Hosp Of Indiana, Indianapolis, In
Group Practice: Corvasc Mds Pc

Data Provided by:
Dolores F Cikrit
(317) 630-6542
1801 N Senate Blvd
Indianapolis, IN
Specialty
Vascular Surgery

Data Provided by:
Michael Cletus Dalsing
(317) 962-0280
1801 N Senate Blvd
Indianapolis, IN
Specialty
Vascular Surgery

Data Provided by:
Huey Barrett Mc Daniel, MD
(775) 789-7000
545 Barnhill Dr
Indianapolis, IN
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
Robert A McCready
(317) 923-1787
1801 Senate Blvd
Indianapolis, IN
Specialty
Vascular Surgery

Data Provided by:
Ryan Dean Nachreiner, MD
(317) 630-6542
OPE 3rd floor 1001 W 10th St
Indianapolis, IN
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loma Linda Univ Sch Of Med, Loma Linda Ca 92350
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided by:
Stephen Gary Lalka, MD
(317) 962-0281
1801 Senate Blvd
Indianapolis, IN
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Rochester Sch Of Med & Dentistry, Rochester Ny 14642
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Harold King, MD, FACC
(317) 274-7949
545 Barnhill Dr Emerson Hall Rm 212
Indianapolis, IN
Specialties
Cardiology, Vascular Surgery, Thoracic Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Dolores F Cikrit, MD
(317) 630-7169
1001 W 10th St
Indianapolis, IN
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med, Denver Co 80262
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Michael Cletus Dalsing, MD
(317) 962-0283
MPC-2 Suite 3500 1801 North Senate Blvd
Indianapolis, IN
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: Indiana Univ Med Ctr, Indianapolis, In
Group Practice: Indiana Vascular Institute Inc

Data Provided by:
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A World Under Pressure

Culture and language may divide us, but one thing that people share no matter where
they are on the globe is a propensity for developing dangerously high blood pressure.
But just because pressure is rising the world over doesn’t mean you have to jump on
this particular trend. There are natural ways to help you and your arteries keep their cool.

By Claire Sykes

February 2008

Industrialized countries are continuing to see their sedentary, fast-food-consuming populations bloat with obesity, and developing nations are picking up the bad health habits of the west. The sum of those disturbing pieces of news is a problem of global proportions.

From the Americas to Africa, the number of people with chronically high blood pressure (also known as hypertension) is growing, threatening a global epidemic of cardiovascular disease. “Until recently, we thought that hypertension was a problem predominantly in North America, Western Europe and Japan. But it’s prevalent in many countries, especially those in Africa, including South Africa, and in Eastern Europe and Latin America,” says Michael Weber, MD, professor of medicine at State University of New York Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn. He also co-authored High Blood Pressure and Health Policy: Where We Are and Where We Need to Go Next, an international report released in May 2007 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

About 1 billion people in the world have high blood pressure, with 60% more expected by 2025, the report states. Just over half of the 72 million Americans with hypertension are women, who are also three times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. This disorder hits African Americans earlier and more seriously than any other ethnic group. Also sobering is the fact that blood pressure is excessive among 19% of kids who are, on average, 13 1/2 years old.

“We’re talking about populations around the world that have become more sedentary in their lifestyles and are consuming significantly more calories than they did a few decades ago,” says Weber. “Countries like India, Malaysia and Vietnam have become industrialized, transitioning from a fairly simple lifestyle to a highly urbanized one. As people have migrated from rural areas into cities, they eat more fast food and walk less, and their blood pressure goes up dramatically.

“Most of the measures that health experts in many countries have taken to address high blood pressure at the patient level—primarily issuing guidelines for how far blood pressure should be reduced in hypertensive patients and also recommending drugs that can help achieve these goals—haven’t been as successful as they should’ve been,” Weber continues. “The problem has been that the guidelines have often been ignored for a variety of reasons, including limited patient access to medical care, cost, indifference on the part of both patients and doctors, and the use of inexpensive older drugs that often cause side effects. It’s a serious ...

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