Grief Counselors Rock Hill SC

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Grief Counselors. You will find helpful, informative articles about Grief Counselors, including "Life After Grief". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Rock Hill, SC that will answer all of your questions about Grief Counselors.

Tracy Sosebee
(704) 384-4255
Rock Hill, SC
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Eating Disorders, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill, Mental Health/Agency Counseling
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Janice Olson
(803) 329-7778
Rock Hill, SC
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Aging/Gerontological, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Terry Crimm
(803) 548-4673
Fort Mill, SC
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, Clinical Mental Health, Eating Disorders, Couples & Family, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Debra Gough
(704) 544-2070
Charlotte, NC
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, School, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Elizabeth Blalock Bartell
(704) 998-7637
Charlotte, NC
Practice Areas
Childhood & Adolescence, School, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Palmetto Counseling & Consulting Services, LLC
(803) 666-8150
Palmetto Counseling & Consulting Services, LLC454 S Anderson Road
Rock Hill, SC
Specialties
Impulse Control Disorders
Qualification
School: University of South Carolina
Year of Graduation: 2003
Years In Practice: 7 Years
Patient Info
Ethnicity: Any
Gender: Male
Age: Adolescents,Adults,Children,Elders
Average Cost
$80 - $110
Payment Methods
Sliding Scale: No
Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
Accepted Insurance Plans: APS Healthcare

Martha Freeman
(803) 493-6694
Rock Hill, SC
Practice Areas
Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor
Language Proficiencies
English

Teri-Lea Fahey
(704) 541-6297
Pineville, NC
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Barbara Kaplan
(704) 527-2108
Charlotte, NC
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Clinical Mental Health, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
Master Addictions Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Cynthia Tice
(704) 365-7777
Charlotte, NC
Practice Areas
Addictions and Dependency, Childhood & Adolescence, Couples & Family, Sexual Abuse Recovery, Depression/Grief/Chronically or Terminally Ill
Certifications
National Certified Counselor

Life After Grief

9/11/2001. It devastated our country and took people from their loved ones in what
seemed like the blink of an eye. In its wake, tens of thousands were left to cope with
senseless and soul-shattering loss. On the fifth anniversary month of that terrible event,
a 9/11 widow—whose firefighter husband died a hero attempting to rescue people from
the burning World Trade Center—reveals how she struggled to maintain her mental
and physical health in the days, months and years following such a life-altering tragedy.

By Marian Fontana

September 2006

It started with jaw pain first—the clenching of the tender area where the jawbone meets the skull—as I watched the World Trade Center burning on television. It was the morning of my eighth wedding anniversary and I had just dropped my son, Aidan, off for his second full day of kindergarten. My husband Dave, a firefighter with a unit in Brooklyn, should have been home getting ready for our day inManhattan together. At the end of his night shift at about 9 am, we planned on going to Central Park for lunch at the boathouse and then taking a personal tour of the sculpture exhibit at the Whitney Museum. Now, instead of getting on the subway with Dave, I am standing in my Brooklyn living room with my friend Lorie and we are witnessing what feels like the end of the world.

As I watched the first tower fall, I knew, on a cellular level, Dave was gone. My heart felt as if it was actually breaking, fissures cracking across its surface and exploding like glass. My knees involuntarily buckled, and sound and sight became distorted. I can almost feel it even now, five years later, the powerful force of adrenaline surging through my body. What was happening inside me was cataclysmic, as though my body was collapsing like the towers, but all of my thoughts and energy were focused on Dave, and praying that somewhere in the midst of that horrible wreckage, he was okay.

When the second tower fell, Lorie panicked. Her kids went to the same nearby school as Aidan. “Do you think they’re safe?” she asked, worry wrinkling her brow. I feel guilty about it now, but Aidan was the last thing on my mind. I was too busy speeding through my 17 years with Dave and trying to grasp the thought that he would not be coming home. I sent Lorie to check on the kids and told her to return with a pack of cigarettes. I hadn’t smoked in 13 years. After she left, I opened a bottle of wine, ignoring the bitter taste at that hour of the morning. I paced as fast as my mind was churning and when Lorie returned, the cigarette forced me to take deep, long breaths. I tried hard to slow my pounding heart as I watched dust from the towers settle softly on the patch of grass in my small backyard.

By 5 pm, it felt like years had passed. I finished the pack of cigarettes and had switched to scotch to keep my hands from shaking. Friends arrived by the dozens offering me anti-depression medication and sleep aids. I was in a foggy stu...

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