Garden Centers Iowa City IA

A garden center is a retail location that supplies the products to meet all your landscaping needs. Garden centers also employ horticulturists that can answer any gardening questions or help you solve garden related problems. Here you will find additional information on Garden Centers, as well as local companies and providers that may help you in your search.

Pleasant Valley Garden Center
(319) 337-3118
1301 S Gilbert St
Iowa City, IA
Products / Services
Annuals, Bulbs, Chemicals, Crop Protection, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Horticulture Companies, Mulch, Perennials, Pest Control Supplies, Plants, Roses, Seeds, Shrubs, Trees, Vines

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Iowa City Landscaping & Garden Center
(319) 337-8351
520 Highway 1 W
Iowa City, IA
Products / Services
Annuals, Aquatics, Arrangement Accessories, Bulbs, Ceramic, Terra Cotta & Stone Containers, Chemicals, Christmas Accessories, Christmas Trees, Christmas Trees - Cut, Christmas Trees - Live B&B, Christmas Trees - Live Container, Conifers / Evergreens, Containers, Containers - Decorative, Crop Protection, Decorative Planters & Urns, Fertilizers, Furniture / Structures, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Gardening Tools, Gardening Supplies, Gifts & Accents, G…

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Joyce's Greenhouse
(319) 626-6525
2836 Kansas Ave Ne
North Liberty, IA

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Lewis Brothers Tree Farm & Nursery
(319) 828-4569
1786 Iwv Rd SW
Cedar Rapids, IA
Ferguson's Landscape & Garden Center
(712) 336-2085
3602 Hwy 715
Spirit Lake, IA
Products / Services
Annuals, Aquatics, Bulbs, Business Services, Chemicals, Conifers / Evergreens, Cut Flowers, Florist, Flowers - Fresh, Flowers - Permanent, Flowers, Foliage & Plant Products, Fountains - Decorative, Fresh Plants, Garden Center Marketing, Garden Centers / Nurseries, Garden Ornaments, Gardening Supplies, Gazing Globes & Stands, Greenhouse Growers, Hardscape Supplies, Horticulture Companies, Houseplants, Industry Supplies & Services, Landscape Consulting, Landscape Contractors, Landscape Design, …

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(319) 337-5623
Petal Puckers, Inc
Iowa City, IA
Products / Services

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Forever Green
(319) 337-5986
466 Sugar Creek Lane
North Liberty, IA
Products / Services

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Sunnyview Greenhouses
(319) 656-2589
5665 Hazelwood Ave Sw
Kalona, IA

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Country Gardens
(712) 273-5606
303 Hwy 71
Early, IA
Products / Services
Perennials, Plants

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(641) 995-2378
9422 150th St
Swaledale, IA

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Organic Gardening Guide

You crave a connection to the earth. You're feeling the need to turn
seeds into veggies. But you haven't a clue how to begin. Well, don't despair.
Learn how you can grow your own.

By Lisa James

April 2005

One of the hot trends of the early seventies (along with way too much polyester) was the great back-to-the-land movement, which saw the children of plasticized suburbia donning overalls, moving to the country and living self-sufficiently off the (low) fat of the land. That’s when the notion of organic gardening—which uses natural methods to enhance soil, control weeds and restrain pests—really took off.

Today, organic growing has gone thoroughly mainstream, and plenty of suburban nine-to-fivers fit a spot of gardening into their busy schedules. You’ve been thinking about grabbing a hoe yourself, but don’t know where and how to begin. Well, with just a little bit of land and the basic information that follows, you’ll develop the proverbial green thumb (and you won’t even need overalls).

Planning Your Peas and Peppers

Eager as you may be to get digging, restrain your enthusiasm for just a moment. The biggest mistake beginners make is planting way more than they can care for—you don’t want the jewel of your April eye turning into a weedy, out-of-control eyesore by August. That’s why a little planning now can save you a lot of headaches later.

Top-Notch Tomatoes

If they grow nothing else, most gardeners cultivate tomatoes. And why not—a juicy tomato right off the vine is an exquisite dining sensation, especially when compared with the tasteless pasteballs that inhabit supermarket shelves. What’s more, tomatoes are almost ridiculously easy to grow (and are packed with lycopene, a red flavonoid associated with healthy hearts and prostates).

Tomatoes come in many styles: Classic round types, sandwich-stuffing beefsteaks, cute little cherries for salads, oblong paste varieties for sauces, tomatoes in yellow and other unusual hues. Your choice is wider if you grow from seed, but if this is your first garden, try transplant-ready seedlings first—ask about varieties that resist verticillium and fusarium wilts, diseases that can kill foliage and cut yields. There’s almost as many systems designed for staking tomatoes as there are tomato varieties; anything that keeps the fruits off the ground (where they are rot-prone) is fine.

When you transfer your baby plants to the garden patch, set them deep—the stems will sprout even more nutrient-lapping roots. But don’t overfeed your new pals unless you’d like lots of leaf and few fruits.

While not exactly organic, red plastic mulch appears to fool tomato plants into thinking they’re back in the tropical South American climes from whence their ancestors sprang, leading to earlier, larger yields. Just make sure the soil below stays moist, especially as the days heat up. (Southern gardeners may opt for organic mulches to avoid having the soil heat up even beyond a tomato plant’...

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Your Green Garden

Living the organic life starts right in your own backyard

March 2010

For many people, spring doesn’t start until they plant a garden. Some are drawn to the peace they experience with their hands in the soil, while others take pride in a beautifully landscaped yard overflowing with flowers. But for many gardeners it’s all about the vegetables: tender baby carrots, sun-ripened tomatoes, perfectly sweet melons.

Organic cultivation—growing vegetables, flowers and other plants without synthetic herbicides and pesticides—is an increasingly popular option among gardeners.

Going organic goes beyond concerns about personal or environmental health. “Pest control using pesticides tends to poke holes in your garden’s ecosystem by completely removing vast numbers of organisms and upsetting a critical natural balance those organisms create,” says master gardener Edward C. Smith, author of The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible (Storey Publishing). “A balanced ecological approach not only works better but it’s also less work.”

If you have always wanted to try organic gardening but wasn’t sure where to start, turn the page for some basic suggestions. ...

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