Farmer's Market Springfield OH

Local resource for farmer’s market in Springfield. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to local produce and organic food, as well as advice and content on healthy eating.

Yellow Springs Farmers' Market in King's Yard
(937) 319-6076
Walnut St. Behind The Trail Tavern
Yellow Springs, OH
Hours
5/1/2010-11/20/2010 Saturday, 7 Am - 12 Pm.
Items
Baked Goods, Cheese, Flowers, Fresh Fruit, Herbs, Honey, Jams Jellies And Preserves, Maple Syrup Or Maple Products, Meat Or Poultry, Nuts, Other Processed Foods, Plants, Vegetables
Vendors
This Market Has 19 Vendors.
Other
Organic: Yes
Year Round?: No
Credit/Debit: No
Wic: No
Snap: No
Sfmnp: No
Wic Cash?: No

Green County Farm Market Association
(937) 372-3281
Beaver Valley & Dayton; Xenia Road, Kmart Parking Lot
Fairborn, OH
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June- Thursday, 2:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.
County
Greene

Volk Fruit Farm
(937) 857-9300
5782 Addison-New Carlisle Pike
Casstown, OH
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-December Monday-Friday, 10:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, 10:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.
County
Miami

Breezy Acres Orchard
(937) 372-2436
3470 Waynesville- Jamestown Road
Xenia, OH
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
July-January Monday-Saturday, 9:00 a.m.- 7:00 p.m.
County
Greene

Xenia Station Farmers Market
(937) 376-7286
Miami Ave.
Xenia, OH
Hours
Friday, 9:00 A.M.- 1:00 P.M.
Other
Year Round?: No
Year Round?: No
Credit/Debit: No
Wic: No
Snap: No
Sfmnp: No
Wic Cash?: No

Fairborn Farmers Market
(937) 754-3030
Corner of Main St. & Grand Ave.
Fairborn, OH
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
April-November Wednesday, 11:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.
County
Greene

Fairborn Farmers Market
(937) 754-3030
Corner Of Main St. &Amp; Grand Ave.
Fairborn, OH
Hours
April-November Wednesday, 11:30 A.M.- 5:30 P.M.
Other
Year Round?: No
Year Round?: No
Credit/Debit: No
Wic: No
Snap: No
Sfmnp: No
Wic Cash?: No

Xenia Station Farmers Market
(937) 376-7286
Miami Ave.
Xenia, OH
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
Friday, 9:00 a.m.- 1:00 p.m.
County
Greene

Anderson Farm Market
(937) 767-7626
1240 Clifton Rd
Xenia, OH
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-October Monday-Saturday, 10:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m.
County
Greene

S.P. Mallow & Sons
(937) 372-1406
914 Bellbrook Avenue
Xenia, OH
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
September-October Sunday, 12:00 p.m.- 5:00 p.m.
County
Greene

Agriculture Shock

The simple act of planting a seed and watching it grow has degraded
into bizarre synthetic agriculture based on chemical pesticides and fertilizers.
More disturbing still are the so-called genetically modified “Frankenfoods” that
further distance fruits and vegetables from nature. But most distressing of all,
chemical agriculture’s crops may contain significantly less nutrition than you think.

By Eric Schneider

November 2007

 When thinking of agriculture, it’s easy to imagine the scene of a farmer in a sunlit field or Johnny Appleseed planting a future orchard. However romantic, these notions touch on the inherent simplicity of farming, which—at its most basic—involves people working with nature to produce food beyond their immediate needs. What doesn’t come to mind are planes dropping clouds of chemicals on an expanse of crops or scientists working to modify plant genes. But, increasingly, these are common aspects of modern agriculture.

 Natural farming methods served the world well for thousands of years. But while the Industrial Revolution brought about exponential innovation and vastly greater yields, in the last half of the 20th century even these strides seemed insufficient in the face of surging population and an insatiable desire for productivity above all else. This quest for ever-higher yields initially focused on deterring crop-eating animals and insects, ultimately leading to many decidedly non-organic tactics.

The elder statesmen of unnatural agricultural practices, chemical pesticides came into prominence during the 1940s. Though pesticides were generally quite effective in exterminating harmful insects, it was discovered that they also left behind compounds that poisoned the environment. This issue was publicly exposed in writer/biologist Rachel Carson’s renowned 1962 book, Silent Spring, which led to the widespread banning of the synthetic DDT and essentially jump-started the environmental movement. But pesticide use has continued (and even increased) since that time, resulting in depletion of nutrients in the soil—which, in turn, means less nutrients in crops—as well as chemical residues that remain in produce. While the Environ­mental Protection Agency (EPA) sets limits on pesticides, the trace amounts allowed in many foods can still be linked directly to illnesses such as cancer and Parkinson’s disease. In a 2005 report published by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), a disturbing 73% of fresh fruit and vegetables tested showed detectable pesticide residues.

Frankenfood Future?
    Concern about pesticides not only brought about increased environmental awareness, it prompted a shift towards organic food, particularly in recent years. Generally overlapping with this period, however, has been the rise of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), the result of scientists altering the structure of plants to obtain a specific immunity or trait rather than ach...

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