Dietary Fiber Supplements Enfield CT

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Ravenswood Natural Health
(860) 264-1587
1606 Hopmeadow Street
Simsbury, CT

Data Provided by:
General Nutrition Centers Inc
(860) 745-5532
Enfield Sq
Enfield, CT
 
Coletta Thompson Rosemarie
(413) 525-5160
281 Maple St
East Longmeadow, MA
 
Shaklee Products
(413) 789-1056
30 Federal Street Ext
Agawam, MA
 
General Nutrition Center
(413) 525-0658
448 N Main St
East Longmeadow, MA
 
Choice Health
(413) 568-8333
307 E. Main St. Route 20
Westfield, MA

Data Provided by:
Health Matters Natural Foods
(860) 745-1617
640 Enfield St
Enfield, CT
 
Advanced Nutrition
(413) 747-0110
451 Dickinson St
Springfield, MA
 
Webvitamins
(860) 627-6627
44 S Main St
East Windsor, CT
 
Brooks Pharmacy
(860) 623-3327
74 Bridge St
East Windsor, CT
 
Data Provided by:

Nutrition, Fiber, Get fabulously healthy with fiber

Get Fabulously Fit with Fiber 
By Monique N. Gilbert

Want to increase your vitality and improve your overall well-being? Then try eating more fiber every day.

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), fiber is important for the health of our digestive system as well as for lowering cholesterol. Dietary fiber is a transparent solid carbohydrate that is the main part of the cell walls of plants. It has two forms: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber may help lower blood cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. Insoluble fiber provides the bulk needed for proper functioning of the stomach and intestines. It promotes healthy intestinal action and prevents constipation by moving bodily waste through the digestive tract faster, so harmful substances don't have as much contact with the intestinal walls. Both the AHA and the National Cancer Institute recommend that we consume 25 to 30 grams of fiber a day.

Unfortunately, many people are not eating this much fiber. The reason is the conventional animal-based Western diet, which is high in saturated fat and low in fiber. This type of diet is causing serious concerns. Heart disease and stroke have become major health problems in most developed countries, and are rapidly increasing in prevalence in many lesser developed countries. This is mainly due to the global influence of the typical Western diet.

Recently the AHA and the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) confirmed that coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, killing more people than any other disease. It causes heart attack and angina (chest pain). A blood clot that goes to the heart is considered a heart attack, but if it goes to the brain it is a stroke. The AHA ranks stoke as the third most fatal disease in America, causing paralysis and brain damage.

Eating a high-fiber diet can significantly lower our risk of heart attack, stroke and colon cancer. A 19-year follow-up study reported in the November 2001 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine indicated that increasing bean and legume intakes may be an important part of a dietary approach to preventing coronary heart disease. Soybeans and legumes are high in protein and soluble fiber. Another study reported in the January 2002 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology also suggests that increasing our consumption of fiber-rich foods like whole grains, fruits and vegetables, can significantly lower the risk of heart disease. Additionally, results from recent studies at the American Institute of Cancer Research indicate high-fiber protein-rich soy-based products, such as textured soy protein and tempeh, help in preventing and treating colon cancer.

Soybeans and other legumes are excellent sources of fiber. An average serving of cooked dry beans contains about 10 grams of fiber. Whole soybeans and foods made from them, such as soy flour, textured soy protein (also known as TVP) and tempeh, are ext...

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