Dietary Fiber Supplements Antioch TN

This page provides useful content and local businesses that give access to Dietary Fiber Supplements in Antioch, TN. You will find helpful, informative articles about Dietary Fiber Supplements, including "Nutrition, Fiber, Get fabulously healthy with fiber". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Antioch, TN that will answer all of your questions about Dietary Fiber Supplements.

Ed Grinder
(615) 832-4461
500 Paragon Mills Rd A6
NASHVILLE, TN

Data Provided by:
Kim's Smoothie Cafe
(615) 781-9500
5704 Nolensville Pike
Nashville, TN
 
Harding Mall Health Foods
(615) 834-3770
4649 Nolensville Pike
Nashville, TN
 
Sloan Reba Mph Lrd
(615) 321-4554
121 21st Ave N
Nashville, TN
 
Back in Touch Wellness
(615) 329-1046
2817 W End Ave Ste 205
Nashville, TN
 
Centre Energique
(615) 347-1036
4219 Hillsboro Road, Suite 338
Nashville, TN
Services
Yoga, Yeast Syndrome, Wellness Training, Weight Management, Supplements, Stress Management, Preventive Medicine, Pain Management, Orthomolecular Medicine, Nutrition, Metabolic Medicine, Meditation, Guided Imagery, Geriatrics, General Practice, Functional Medicine, Energy Medicine, Diabetes, Chelation Therapy, Bio-identical HRT, Biofeedback, Ayurveda, Auriculotherapy, Arthritis, Aromatherapy, Anesthesiology, Acupuncture
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided by:
Strong Body
(615) 837-9003
5035 Harding Pl
Nashville, TN
 
New Life Nutrition & Fitness Inc
(615) 742-1522
1602 8th Ave S
Nashville, TN
 
Smoothie King
(615) 321-4909
2422 Elliston Pl
Nashville, TN
 
Country Lifestyle Center
(615) 327-3695
1917 Division St
Nashville, TN
 
Data Provided by:

Nutrition, Fiber, Get fabulously healthy with fiber

Get Fabulously Fit with Fiber 
By Monique N. Gilbert

Want to increase your vitality and improve your overall well-being? Then try eating more fiber every day.

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), fiber is important for the health of our digestive system as well as for lowering cholesterol. Dietary fiber is a transparent solid carbohydrate that is the main part of the cell walls of plants. It has two forms: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber may help lower blood cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. Insoluble fiber provides the bulk needed for proper functioning of the stomach and intestines. It promotes healthy intestinal action and prevents constipation by moving bodily waste through the digestive tract faster, so harmful substances don't have as much contact with the intestinal walls. Both the AHA and the National Cancer Institute recommend that we consume 25 to 30 grams of fiber a day.

Unfortunately, many people are not eating this much fiber. The reason is the conventional animal-based Western diet, which is high in saturated fat and low in fiber. This type of diet is causing serious concerns. Heart disease and stroke have become major health problems in most developed countries, and are rapidly increasing in prevalence in many lesser developed countries. This is mainly due to the global influence of the typical Western diet.

Recently the AHA and the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) confirmed that coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, killing more people than any other disease. It causes heart attack and angina (chest pain). A blood clot that goes to the heart is considered a heart attack, but if it goes to the brain it is a stroke. The AHA ranks stoke as the third most fatal disease in America, causing paralysis and brain damage.

Eating a high-fiber diet can significantly lower our risk of heart attack, stroke and colon cancer. A 19-year follow-up study reported in the November 2001 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine indicated that increasing bean and legume intakes may be an important part of a dietary approach to preventing coronary heart disease. Soybeans and legumes are high in protein and soluble fiber. Another study reported in the January 2002 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology also suggests that increasing our consumption of fiber-rich foods like whole grains, fruits and vegetables, can significantly lower the risk of heart disease. Additionally, results from recent studies at the American Institute of Cancer Research indicate high-fiber protein-rich soy-based products, such as textured soy protein and tempeh, help in preventing and treating colon cancer.

Soybeans and other legumes are excellent sources of fiber. An average serving of cooked dry beans contains about 10 grams of fiber. Whole soybeans and foods made from them, such as soy flour, textured soy protein (also known as TVP) and tempeh, are ext...

Click here to read the rest of this article from 1stholistic.com