Chronic Inflammation Treatments Honolulu HI

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George Ewing
(808) 521-2712
1329 Lusitana Street
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
Carl Lehman
(808) 521-9412
1329 Lusitana Street
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
Jeffrey C Kam
(808) 522-4310
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialty
Allergy / Immunology

Data Provided by:
James M Sweet, MD
(808) 533-7311
1329 Lusitana St Ste 506
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided by:
Dr.Philip Kuo
1329 Lusitana St # 202
Honolulu, HI
Gender
M
Speciality
Allergist / Immunologist
RateMD Rating
2.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Jeffrey Carter Kam, MD
(808) 522-4310
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology, Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of The East, Ramon Magsaysay Mem Med Ctr, Quezon City
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: Straub Clinic And Hosp, Honolulu, Hi; Kapiolani Med Ctr At Pali Momi, Aiea, Hi
Group Practice: Straub Clinic & Hospital

Data Provided by:
Yoshio Oda, MD
(808) 523-5503
1024 Piikoi St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Allergy
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1959

Data Provided by:
George Jenhua Chu, MD
(808) 532-1311
1329 Lusitana St Ste 102
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1971

Data Provided by:
Carl Wm Lehman, MD
(808) 521-9412
1329 Lusitana St Ste 603
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology, Pediatrics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided by:
Matthew Scott Lau, MD
(808) 486-4886
1010 Pensacola St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Allergy & Immunology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Hi John A Burns Sch Of Med, Honolulu Hi 96822
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided by:
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Fight Fire with Food

Fight Fire with Food

Chronic inflammation causes no outward symptoms such as swelling or pain.
Instead, it creates an insidious slow burn that can set the stage for heart disease and
other health disasters. The good news is that watching what you eat and adopting
an anti-inflammatory supplementation program may help cool this hidden flame—
before it seriously singes your well-being.

by Lisa James

November 2008

When Shauna first showed up at her practitioner’s office, she was in sorry shape: 55 pounds overweight, exhausted, depressed. Her troubles had begun six years earlier, when she starting taking artificial hormones to fight menopausal hot flashes and wound up on blood pressure medication to deal with the hormone’s side effects.

Her practitioner ordered blood tests and was shocked by the results for an inflammation marker called C-reactive protein (CRP). Anything over 3.0 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) would be considered high—and Shauna’s level was 22.0. Meta­bolically, Shauna was on fire.

Two years later, Shauna’s blood pressure is normal and her CRP is 1.8 mg/dL. She’s managed to lose those 55 extra pounds. What’s more, “she looks ten years younger,” says Mark Hyman, MD, Shauna’s practitioner and the author of UltraMetabolism: The Simple Plan for Automatic Weight Loss (Atria Books). “The importance of finding the source of, and treating, inflammation cannot be overstated.”

Finding inflammation may not be easy, since low levels may produce no symptoms. Or, as in Shauna’s case, a person may feel miserable—and never suspect inflammation as a possible culprit.

Internal Arsonists
Turn an ankle and your immune system creates pain, heat and swelling to keep you from moving it. This reaction, called acute inflammation, shuts itself off after the crisis passes. The problem starts when the immune system is always irritated, like someone swatting repeatedly at a persistent mosqu­ito. This results in a similar reaction that causes low-level chronic inflammation, which affects the entire body.

One cause of chronic inflammation can be found in what’s called toxic overload. “We’re so bombarded with toxins from an early age—heavy metals, pesticides, herbicides,” says Jessica Black, ND, co-founder of A Family Healing Center in Portland, Oregon and author of The Anti-Inflammation Diet and Recipe Book (Hunter House). “It sets off an imbalance in the immune system.”

Inflammation and Arthritis

While low-level inflammation often creates no symptoms, the same cannot be said of osteoarthritis (OA), which is present in just about everyone over age 60. Joint inflammation causes cartilage damage that in turn may lead to pain and stiffness, especially in the morning—think of the “morning shuffle” that can make getting out of bed an adventure. The damage accumulates as time goes on, which can result in diminished range of motion, swelling and even deformity.

Adopting an anti-inflammatory diet is the first ...

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