Cancer Therapy Natchez MS

Cancer can affect every part of the body. Cancer treatment varies widely and may include anti-cancer drugs, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, surgery, biological therapies, bone marrow transplantations, targeted cancer therapies, and others. See below to learn more and to gain access to oncologists in Natchez, MS who provide cancer therapy.

Jack Joseph Rodriguez, MD
(601) 442-9210
150 Jefferson Davis Blvd Ste 12
Natchez, MS
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Ponce Sch Of Med, Ponce Pr 00732
Graduation Year: 1991
Hospital
Hospital: Natchez Community Hospital, Natchez, Ms; Natchez Reg Med Ctr, Natchez, Ms
Group Practice: Natchez Oncology Clinic

Data Provided by:
Jack Rodriguez
(601) 442-9210
150 Jeff Davis Blvd
Natchez, MS
Specialty
Hematology-Oncology
Associated Hospitals
Natchez Oncology Clinic

Sidney A Johnson Jr, MD
(662) 327-7525
600 Leigh Dr
Columbus, MS
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology, Emergency Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ms Sch Of Med, Jackson Ms 39216
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided by:
Dennis P Morgan
(662) 236-7738
504 Azalea Dr
Oxford, MS
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology

Data Provided by:
Hubert Earl Spears
(662) 234-1530
2169 S Lamar Blvd
Oxford, MS
Specialty
General Surgery, Colorectal Surgery (formerly Proctology), Surgical Oncology

Data Provided by:
Roderick Givens
(601) 442-1285
133 Jefferson Davis Blvd
Natchez, MS
Specialty
Radiation Oncology
Associated Hospitals
Cancer Care & Diagnostic Ctr

G C Stubblefield, MD
(601) 355-2485
1227 N State St Ste 101
Jackson, MS
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ms Sch Of Med, Jackson Ms 39216
Graduation Year: 1968

Data Provided by:
Dale Jeanette Pullen, MD
(601) 984-5220
2500 N State St
Jackson, MS
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Pediatrics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1961
Hospital
Hospital: Univ Of Mississippi Med Ctr, Jackson, Ms
Group Practice: University Clinic Associates; University Pediatrics Associates

Data Provided by:
James Michael Herrington
(601) 288-8282
301 S 28th Ave
Hattiesburg, MS
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Dennis P Morga, MR
(662) 236-7738
504 Azalea Dr Ste A
Oxford, MS
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Female Dangers

While breast cancer is the biggest and most publicized cancer threat American
women face, it is not the only female-specific cancer. Cervical, ovarian and uterine
malignancies affect thousands each year. Learn what to look out for so you don’t fall victim.

By Lisa James

May 2006

If someone says the words “female” and “cancer” to you, the first word that probably pops into your head is “breast.” After all, the numbers are hard to ignore: Almost 213,000 American women develop breast malignancies each year…and more than 40,000 die from them.

But a woman overlooks her reproductive tract at her peril; just ask actress Fran Drescher, who graced the cover of last year’s Annual ET Cancer Issue. In her book, Cancer Schmancer (Warner Books), Drescher explains how she saw nine doctors—count ’em, nine—before her uterine cancer was finally discovered and treated, leaving her unable to bear children. “Women need to understand gynecological cancers and the tests that can help detect them,” she writes. “We have to…become educated consumers, network among ourselves, and gain information and insight into getting diagnosed and getting treatment. Someone gimme a podium!”

Taking our lead from “The Nanny,” ET presents what you need to know about three cancers—cervical, ovarian and uterine—that should be on every woman’s radar. (Statistics given are 2006 estimates from the American Cancer Society [ACS].)

Uterine Cancer: A Hormonal Challenge

What it is: Most are endometrial cancers; they arise in the inner lining (endometrium) of the uterus, the part that grows and is shed over the course of a woman’s menstrual cycle. Tumors called sarcomas can develop in the muscle tissue, but account for only 2% to 4% of all uterine cancers.
Number of women affected: 41,200 cases of endometrial cancer (the most common reproductive-tract malignancy) and 7,350 deaths. It is one of the more treatable cancers though, with a five-year survival rate of 84%.

At greatest risk: Roughly 70% of all women affected are between the ages of 45 and 74. Endometrial cancer shares a lot of risk factors with ovarian cancer because excessive estrogen exposure promotes overgrowth of the uterine lining. Taking the drug tamoxifen for breast cancer also increases risk, as does having undergone pelvic radiation therapy. Genetic history is another factor, particularly in families affected by hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC).

The symptoms: Abnormal bleeding, especially after menopause. Pain and weight loss can be signs of late-stage disease.

The tests: There are no standard screening tests for this kind of cancer. Abnormal bleeding may prompt your doctor to perform an endometrial biopsy, in which a thin needle is passed through the cervical opening to collect cells in the uterine lining.

Vital info: Try your best to drop those extra pounds. Obesity ups the risk of hormonally driven cancers because fat tissue can transform other hormones into estr...

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