Cancer Clinics Ferndale MI

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Michael Joseph Stender, MD
Madison Heights, MI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided by:
Kenneth Lloyd Bergsman, MD
(313) 966-3250
6071 W Outer Dr
Detroit, MI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Oh State Univ Coll Of Med, Columbus Oh 43210
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided by:
Nitin Gangadhar Vaishampayan
(248) 589-5000
30365 Dequindre Rd
Madison Heights, MI
Specialty
Radiation Oncology

Data Provided by:
Tosan A Fregene
(249) 967-8800
20770 Greenfield Rd
Oak Park, MI
Specialty
General Practice, Internal Medicine, Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Susan Elaine Harold
(313) 861-3500
6001 W Outer Dr
Detroit, MI
Specialty
Hematology / Oncology, Medical Oncology

Data Provided by:
Charles Wesley Baker, MD
21040 Greenfield Rd
Oak Park, MI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med, Denver Co 80262
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided by:
Jeffrey H Margolis
(248) 399-4400
27301 Dequindre Rd
Madison Heights, MI
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Hematology / Oncology

Data Provided by:
Michael Berkovic
(248) 399-4400
27301 Dequindre Rd
Madison Heights, MI
Specialty
Medical Oncology

Data Provided by:
Savitha Balaraman
(248) 399-4400
27301 Dequindre Rd
Madison Heights, MI
Specialty
Medical Oncology

Data Provided by:
Joel Laurence Appel, DO
6071 West Outer Drive Medicine
Detroit, MI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Hlth Sci, Coll Of Osteo Med, Kansas City Mo 64124
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Living With Cancer

Cancer is more than just a bunch of cells that have run riot. Behind the test findings
in every case is a person who has to deal with the illness and its impact on all the other
facets of one’s existence, including work and relationships. Meet three people who have
adapted their lives to cancer’s everyday reality—and learned about
themselves in the process.

By Claire Sykes

May 2008

From diagnosis to treatment and beyond, cancer is a challenging road. Formerly a near-certain death sentence, the disease is often now more of a detour. The five-year relative survival rate for all cancers diagnosed between 1996 and 2003 is 66%, up from 50% in the period between 1975 and 1977, according to the American Cancer Society. (The rate compares survival among cancer patients to that of people of the same age, race and sex not diagnosed with cancer.) The improvement in survival reflects progress in diagnosing certain types of cancer at an earlier stage and advances in treatment. Factors such as behavior are difficult to gauge in survival, though the selflessness and determination of the following three survivors, and the emotional support they received, appears to have played a role in their endurance. Here are their stories.

Cynthia’s Story: A Complicated Pregnancy

Two and a half years ago, a pregnant Cynthia Lufkin, 45, was examining her breasts. “I felt unusual changes, not like my first pregnancy,” the Washington, Connecticut, philanthropist recalls. Mammograms were not an option because a baby was due, and three doctor visits in five months uncovered nothing. Then, 32.5 weeks along in her pregnancy, she was diagnosed with breast cancer.

Lufkin had to give birth as quickly as possible via C-section so treatment wouldn’t harm the baby. One doctor urged chemotherapy, another a bilateral mastectomy. Lufkin chose the latter. Meanwhile, because she was born prematurely, little Aster Lee was suffering complications of her own and was put on oxygen, with a 50-50 chance of making it through the night. “For those 12 days before my surgery, it was unbearable, not knowing if my baby or I was going to die,” Lufkin says.

When Lufkin awoke from anesthesia, her newborn was breathing on her own. But two weeks after her surgery, Lufkin started chemotherapy followed by radiation. “There was no question about either,” she says.

To stay as healthy as possible, Lufkin watched her diet and kept herself moving. With her the whole way was Donna Wilson, RN, MSN, RRT, personal trainer, at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, who says, “Chemotherapy causes fatigue and weight gain, and radiation can cause more scar tissue, making full range of motion difficult. Cynthia’s exercises were stretches and arm movements coordinated with her breathing, to decrease stress and return mobility, relieve soreness and stiffness, and improve posture and circulation.”

Before chemo could take her hair, Lufkin had it removed. “That was tough,” she says. “To ev...

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