Back Pain Treatment Honolulu HI

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Waterfront Physical Therapy Llc
(808) 593-4005
1221 Kapiolani Blvd
Honolulu, HI
Industry
Physical Therapist, Psychologist

Data Provided by:
Hawaii Physical Therapy Inc
(808) 596-7200
725 Kapiolani Blvd Ste 202
Honolulu, HI
Industry
Physical Therapist

Data Provided by:
Kobayashi Keiichi Md
(808) 945-3719
1441 Kapiolani Blvd
Honolulu, HI
Industry
Osteopath (DO), Physical Therapist, Psychologist

Data Provided by:
Soothing Soles LLC
(808) 531-8600
223 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Industry
Physical Therapist

Data Provided by:
Muscle Release Center
(808) 596-2240
320 Ward Ave Ste 107
Honolulu, HI
Industry
Massage Practitioner, Physical Therapist

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Classic Massage & Facials
(808) 536-2222
1188 Bishop St Ste 1404
Honolulu, HI
Industry
Massage Practitioner, Physical Therapist

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Chart Rehailitation of Hawaii
(808) 523-9043
826 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Industry
Physical Therapist

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Oda Ohana Chiro & Massage
(808) 942-2232
1481 S King St Ste 438
Honolulu, HI
Industry
Health Spa, Physical Therapist

Data Provided by:
Fancher Linda E Md
(808) 597-8038
1010 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Industry
Osteopath (DO), Physical Therapist

Data Provided by:
Civic Massage Therapy
(808) 593-4436
1314 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Industry
Massage Practitioner, Osteopath (DO), Physical Therapist, Psychologist

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

We've Got Your Back

There’s a better answer to avoiding back problems or alleviating your pain than
popping anti-inflammatories every day. It all boils down to stretching and strengthening
your spine and back muscles. Here, ET offers some basic exercises that might help
you prevent trips to the doctor and the MRI machine.

By Stephen Hanks

January 2007

It’s hard to believe that the most debilitating and excruciating pain that affects many Americans comes from activities that don’t require a lot of exertion. Sure it’s possible to suffer neck, spine and back problems from a trauma like an accident while driving or getting injured on a playing field. But most people can attribute back pain to poor posture and sleep habits, prolonged positioning in front of a computer screen or behind the wheel of a car, everyday stress and good old wear and tear due to age (otherwise known as arthritis or degenerative joint disease). For women over 50, some back problems are related to osteoporosis (the deterioration of bones in the spine, hip and other areas).

Back pain has become one of America’s most serious health problems. According to a 2005 report from the North American Spine Society (NASS, www.spine.org), one out of every 14 people sought medical care for back or neck pain (that’s 14 million visits per year), and back pain was the second most common reason people visited a physician. The social and economic cost is like a stab in the back, as the combination of back and neck pain result in more lost workdays than any other condition. Absenteeism and medical expenses due to back injury exceeds $80 billion each year.

If that isn’t depressing enough, the future picture will definitely get your back up. The NASS projects that 80% of people over age 30 will experience back problems at some point in their lives and that 30% of those folks will have recurring problems.

But suffering from back pain doesn’t have to be inevitable for everyone. While the treatments for back problems range from ice and rest for mild pain to surgery for severe and chronic conditions, there is a way you can prevent back pain or at least stave it off for as long into your old age as possible—exercise! Here’s seven basic exercises that can stretch and strengthen those muscles. With a little effort you can keep your back fit and strong.

BACK ARCH

This exercise combines two basic back stretches—the all-fours arch and the all-fours tilt (aptly named because you’re starting the exercise on “all fours”). A: Start with your hands and knees on the floor and your upper body parallel with the floor; shoulders over your hands and hips aligned with your knees. B: Tilt your pelvis as if you’re pushing your tummy to the floor and hold for 5 to 10 seconds. C: Then push your lower back toward the ceiling. Be careful not to jerk your head and neck up and down or it will strain your spine. Repeat 10 to 15 times.

UPPER TRUNK RAISE

This exercise not only stretches the back muscles, it strengthens ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Energy Times