Arthritis Treatment Houston TX

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Arthritis Treatment. You will find informative articles about Arthritis Treatment, including "Feed Your Joints". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Houston, TX that can help answer your questions about Arthritis Treatment.

Tariq Hanna Khalaf
(713) 654-1000
2101 Crawford St
Houston, TX
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Asif Cochinwala, MD
(713) 862-5400
1740 W 27th St
Houston, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Dow Med Coll, Univ Of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided by:
Asif Cochinwala
(713) 862-5400
1740 W 27th St
Houston, TX
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Alan David Croock, MD
(713) 798-4491
3601 N MacGregor Way
Houston, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of The Witwatersrand, Med Sch, Johannesburg, So Africa
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided by:
Nilda L Colon, MD
(713) 272-2600
3601 N MacGregor Way
Houston, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pr Sch Of Med, San Juan Pr 00936
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided by:
Oluyemisi Awobokun
(713) 960-8008
4545 Post Oak Place Dr
Houston, TX
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Dianne E Wollaston, MD
(713) 408-2326
PO Box 70885
Houston, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: U Of Tx Med Sch At Houston, Houston Tx 77225
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided by:
Barbara J Lister, MD
(713) 828-5945
3100 Weslayan St
Houston, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Baylor Coll Of Med, Houston Tx 77030
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided by:
Louis Berman, MD
(713) 523-4478
1200 Binz St
Houston, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of The Witwatersrand, Med Sch, Johannesburg, So Africa
Graduation Year: 1957
Hospital
Hospital: Park Plaza Hospital, Houston, Tx

Data Provided by:
Louis Berman
(713) 523-4478
1200 Binz St Ste 1130
Houston, TX
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Feed Your Joints

The common misconception of arthritis is that your tired ol’ knees or hands or hips just
wear away with age. Not true! Arthritic joints actually starve for nutrients and healthy living,
including sensible supplementation, can give them the nourishment they need.

By Lisa James

October 2006

If arthritis doesn’t seem quite as inevitable as death and taxes, it certainly gives that famous pair a run for their money. Do you know anyone much over the age of 45 or so who doesn’t ache somewhere? How long does it take you to work out all the kinks when you first wake up? No wonder arthritis is the most common joint disorder in the world.

But it only seems as if we’re all doomed to creak with age. “When you look at many peoples around the world who follow a more traditional lifestyle, they don’t have any arthritis in their bodies at all,” says herbalist and naturopathic physician Eugene Zampheron, cofounder of the University of Bridgeport’s College of Naturopathic Medicine in Connecticut and coauthor (with Ellen Kamhi, RN, HNC) of Arthritis: Reverse Underlying Causes of Arthritis With Clinically Proven Alternative Therapies (Celestial Books). “The only times they get arthritis is if they sustain injuries to the bone that provides blood to the joint.”

To understand why modern folk are so arthritis-prone, let’s look at the anatomy. Free-moving joints, such as knees and knuckles, consist of the ends of the adjoining bones padded by cartilage, a tough, smooth, slippery substance that keeps the bones from grinding together. This cartilage—and everything else within the joint—is covered by the synovial membrane, which produces a nourishing, lubricating fluid. The whole thing is surrounded by tendons, ligaments and muscles that provide support and movement. (The joints between the spinal vertebrae consist of cartilage pads, allowing for more protection but less flexibility.)

Something this complicated can easily go awry, and in fact there are more than 100 different varieties of arthritis. But the mother of all arthritic disorders is osteoarthritis (OA). “Cartilage is composed of water, collagen, which is a structural protein, and glycoseaminoglucans (GAG), which acts as a cushion between the bones,” Zampheron explains. “In arthritis, this structure begins to erode and the body tries to immobilize the joint with calcium by building bridges between the bones as the process continues.” End result: stiffness, pain and decreased range of motion. (In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the second most common type, the immune system goes haywire and attacks joint tissues; the ultimate outcome—cartilage destruction—is the same.)

OA is commonly thought of as a “wear ’n tear” disease, in which joints just naturally grind down over time. Actually, the main culprit isn’t overwork but undernutrition. “Cartilage is like a sponge,” Zampheron says. “When you squeeze it waste products go out; when you release, it opens up and nutrients rush in from the synov...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Energy Times